Tag Archives: Colorado Spring gardening tips

Grow a Thriving Vegetable Garden This Summer

There’s something so satisfying about planting a garden, watching it grow and harvesting its delicious fruits to feed your family. From a single tomato plant in a container to a quarter-acre vegetable garden, there are all kinds of ways your family can enjoy delicious fruits and vegetables all the way through early winter. Best of all, you can feel 100 percent confident that the produce you consume is pesticide- and herbicide-free.

Here are a few tips for growing a thriving Colorado vegetable garden this summer.

Contemporary Landscape by Wheat Ridge Landscape Architects & Landscape Designers Jocelyn H. Chilvers

Source: Jocelyn H. Chilvers via Houzz

Start with the soil. One of the reasons conventional produce lacks the nutrient content of its organically-grown counterparts is that commercial soil is overused and devoid of nutrients. Provide a great foundation for your vegetable garden by amending the soil. In addition to enhancing nutrient and beneficial microorganism content, you’ll also increase the soil’s ability to retain moisture, which will help you conserve water. Using raised beds is the easiest way to build your soil exactly how you want it for higher, healthier yields.

Contemporary Landscape by Vancouver Landscape Architects & Landscape Designers Aloe Designs

Source: Aloe Designs via Houzz

Choose the right veggies. Just like your other landscape plants, each vegetable has its own preferred climate, water needs, etc. Heirloom vegetables, as opposed to their hybrid descendents, are often your best bet. Consider varieties like the Navajo Yellow Melon, Jing Orange Okra and Winter Luxury Pumpkin Pie.

Rustic Landscape by Vancouver General Contractors Rob Kyne

Source: Rob Kyne via Houzz

Understand the importance of timing. Your garden won’t thrive together all at once. Different plants have different maturity times, so you’ll want to schedule your planting and/or harvesting accordingly.

Traditional Landscape by Sterling Landscape Architects & Landscape Designers SURROUNDS Landscape Architecture + Construction

Source: SURROUNDS Landscape Architecture + Construction via Houzz

Learn companion planting. Some vegetables do better than others in the garden. Companion planting is a great way to take advantage of dynamic combinations like:

  • carrots, celery, cucumbers and radishes
  • cauliflower, cabbage and lettuce
  • asparagus, basil, parsley and tomato
  • corn, beans, cucumber, melon, parsley, pea, potato, pumpkin and squash

 

Conversely, some veggies do not do well when planted together such as:

  • broccoli and tomatoes
  • carrots and dill
  • potatoes and squash
  • beans and onions

 

Learning about these relationships will enhance your garden’s yield.

Are you interested in growing a sustainable Colorado vegetable garden this summer? Contact Lifescape Colorado today, and we can assist you with your landscape’s design and implementation.

Fight Weed Growth the Organic Way

Weeding is a great way to spend time outdoors, get a little exercise and be productive in your garden. But when weeds proliferate, and you’re tired of spending countless hours in a seemingly endless endeavor, it’s tempting to grab the strongest chemical weed killer on the market and go to war. Even so, you should really reconsider before doing this. All those chemicals are terrible for the long-term health of your soil, your garden and the environment.

Instead, fight weed growth the organic way. The following gardening tips will help you win the battle against weeds in your Colorado garden without doing any further harm to your surrounding environment.

Beat-Weeds-Miners-Lettuce

Source: Organic Gardening

Get to know your weeds. The best way to fight weeds is know what you’re battling. Use a field guide to identify new growth, so you can plan the best route to eradication. You’ll be able to deal with everything from shallow-rooted annuals to deep-rooted perennials.

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Source: Organic Gardening

Prevention is the next step. Once you know which weeds you may be up against, preventing them from seeding is the next step to starting your organic weed control campaign. Try:

  • Using a broad fork. Rototilling brings deeply buried seeds up to the surface to germinate. A broad fork, rather than digging or tilling, loosens the soil without unearthing as many pesky seeds.
  • Waiting. Once your beds are prepared, wait three to four days so you can remove the weeds that germinate before planting.
  • Mulching. Use a seed-free straw or a thick layer of mulch around seedlings to block remaining weed seeds from sunlight.
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Source: Organic Gardening

Remove them with roots intact. Deep-rooted weeds should be removed with their roots intact. Wait for a rain shower or after a good soaking so the soil is moist enough, then pull them up by the base. Don’t yank them or you risk breakage. Without any roots/runners left underground, they can’t come back.

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Source: Organic Gardening

Dig ‘em out. For particular tenacious weeds, be prepared to dig. It may take a few sessions to remove the entirety of the weed’s roots and runners.

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Design by Lifescape Colorado

Plant densely. Let your own native and drought tolerant landscape choke weeds out rather than the other way around.

Are you interested in growing a sustainable and weed-free garden? If so, contact us at Lifescape Colorado to get your garden in tip top shape the healthy way.

A Colorado Gardener’s May Checklist

Finally, spring has sprung! These glorious, sunshine-filled days can be spent out in your garden if your irrigation is in place and your soil is properly amended. Once the basics are in place, you can begin the exciting task of planting bulbs, flowers, shrubs and trees to create your landscape masterpiece. Here are some gardening tips for the month of May to get you started in your Colorado garden.

drip irrigation

Source: Organic Gardening

Evaluate your irrigation system. Ideally, the bulk of your irrigation should be happening at ground level via soaker hoses and/or drip systems. Overhead watering can lead to leaf burn and excess moisture can also make plants more susceptible to fungus and disease.

watering plants

Source: Organic Gardening

Practice deep watering. Deep watering is recommended to encourage root-growth deep under ground where water is protected from dehydration. This watering technique is beneficial for both ornamental plants, as well as those in your vegetable garden. Let soil dry out in between waterings to allow it to oxygenate.

organic fertilizer

Source: Organic Gardening

Fertilize and amend. Amend the soil in your plant beds and fertilize your lawn. We recommend using organic amendments and fertilizers for a more sustainable and healthy landscape.

greenhouse

Source: Organic Gardening

Start hardening off your greenhouse plants. Are you ready to move those greenhouse plants and vegetable garden-starters outdoors? Make sure to harden them first, and move pots outdoors for longer and longer periods everyday over a couple of weeks. This will protect them from shock.

planting

Source: Organic Gardening

Start planting. Once you’re sure the last frost has passed, it’s time to start planting your summer-blooming plants and flowers. Summer favorites like gladiolus, dahlias, begonias and lilies do well when planted this time of year. Also, concentrate on drought-tolerant native plants to conserve water and feed local bees, butterflies and birds.

lilac

Source: Organic Gardening

Prune abundant spring blooms. By now, some of your spring blooms – like lilac – are ready to be pruned. These ornamental bushes should be pruned back fairly quickly after blooming to encourage healthy new growth.

Contact Lifescape Colorado for more gardening tips, or to get your landscape in shape for summer.

A Colorado Gardener’s April Checklist

It seems as if we were just rolling out Colorado Gardening Tips for January last week, and here April is already upon us! The good news for everyone is that our extended lead-up to spring provides extra time for procrastinators to catch up on winter chores and launch right into our spring checklist.

So, without further ado, here is your checklist for April gardens.

Houzz

Source: Amy Renea via Houzz

Get your soil in shape. Finally, we get to plant! April is the month when the large majority of the frosts and freezes are behind us, and we can begin to plant with confidence. If you haven’t done so already, make sure to amend your soil so it contains just the right balance of airspace for aeration, hydration retention and microbes. You can hire the professionals at Lifescape Colorado to test your soil and make recommendations for healthy amending. And, of course, don’t forget to mulch!

Source: Jocelyn H. Chilvers via Houzz

Transplanting. Do you have some transplanting to do this season? Perhaps there’s a tree that needs to be relocated or a shrub with too many exposed roots? If so, this is the time to dig them up (take advantage of the moist and softened soil) and relocate them to their future home.

Houzz

Source: Jocelyn H. Chilvers via Houzz

Bare root planting. Bare-root planting offers a way to save significant money on established plants, but you have to seize the planting window as it comes. That time is usually around mid- to late-April in Colorado. Examples of bare-root plants include fruit trees, roses, clematis, rhubarb, strawberries and asparagus. Pass up plants that have begun leafing out or have roots that appear dried up or rotten.

Design by Lifescape Colorado

Get your lawn in shape. April is the month to core-aerate your lawn. Removing slugs of grass and dirt keeps roots from getting choked off, allowing them to get the air, water and nutrients they need. Apply an organic fertilizer to give your plants a growth boost. Consider turning to a professional landscape maintenance company to ensure you lawn remains vibrant all season.

Contact Lifescape Colorado for professional spring landscaping assistance.

Simple Spring Landscaping Tips

Spring is less than a month away, which means spring landscaping in Colorado is just around the corner. While it’s still a little early for planting without the worry of snow or frost, there is plenty you can do to finalize plans, prepare the soil and begin enhancing your curb appeal.

5 Simple Spring Landscaping Tips to Get You in the Mood

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Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Go ahead and plant. Just do it indoors where your plants will be safe from the remainder of our storms and freezes. Use small pots to sow hardy annuals and perennials to add to your garden in late spring.

Houzz

Source: Rugo/ Raff Ltd. Architects via Houzz

Finalize your plans. By this point, you should have a strategy in place for spring landscaping. These questions can get you started:

  • Are you hiring a professional landscaping company?
  • Will the work be done in phases or all at once?
  • Have you identified the areas that get the most sun, wind and shade, as well as those with drainage issues?
  • What pests will you be dealing with, and are you prepared for them with fencing, mesh, and/or pest-resistant plantings?
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Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Clean up your current landscape. Use weekends to begin cutting back ornamental grasses and late-blooming fall perennials. Remove dead plant material and garden debris. When the weather is nice enough, you can start turning the soil bed by bed, being careful of perennial roots and bulbs. You can also use Lifescape’s professional landscaping and maintenance services to prepare your landscape.

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Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Prepare lawns. Nothing is worse than staring at brown patches of lawn once spring is in full swing. Take soil samples to test the pH of your soil. Amend the soil as necessary and add appropriate fertilizers. Your soil will be ready for reseeding in late spring.

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Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Prepare plant beds. Similar rules apply to your plant beds. Remove dead plant material and turn the soil. Cover them with plastic sheets to create a greenhouse effect, which will warm the soil below so it’s ready for late spring plantings.

Contact Lifescape Colorado for professional assistance with your spring landscaping in Colorado.