Tag Archives: Outdoor living spaces Denver

Eclectic Outdoor Garden Styles

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Source: Matt Kilburn via Houzz

There’s no cardinal rule of landscaping that says you can’t mix design styles. In fact, two of the most well-known early-20th century garden designers, architect Edwin Lutyens and plantswoman Gertrude Jekyll, were known for doing just that. Lutyens designed hardscapes and used Jekyll’s intuitive ability to choose plants that would create a unique and special garden space.

You can incorporate some of their techniques to create an eclectic Colorado garden design in your backyard landscape.

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Source Jeffrey Gordon Smith Landscape Architecture via Houzz

Understand the role of architectural hardscapes

The hardscape designs form both the skeleton of your finished landscape, as well as unique features. Think carefully about how you can use the classic geometry of hardscaping to create walkways, plant beds, terraces and water features. Then, think a little outside the box to give them a different or creative flair.

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Source: Kathleen Shaeffer Design, Exterior Spaces via Houzz

Masculine and feminine

Formal landscape designs lean more towards the masculine. It’s all about straight edges, symmetrical, geometric shapes and solid boundaries. You can appreciate the beauty of a formal hardscape design and then soften the edges by using rounded, draping and flowering plants.

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Source: Pam Adams via Houzz

Be creative

Remember, we mentioned combining classic hardscape geometry with a creative twist? There are many ways to go about this. One example is the use of a traditional concrete walkway that becomes a part of a water feature’s path. Incorporate art pieces during the warm, dry season and use sculptures as a means of adding the unexpected to your landscape. Traditionally, a line of garden containers is planted with uniformly formal plants. You can shift the tradition by planting them with a variation of softer, asymmetrical plants.

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Source: Shades Of Green Landscape Architecture via Houzz

Make a graceful entrance

The entrance to the home is often an area where architects lean toward a more formal design, since this makes a more dramatic impression. You can enjoy a very classic and formal entryway, while still experiencing the graceful and feminine energy provided by groundcover that intentionally spills over onto walkways.

Contact Lifescape Colorado to begin creating your own eclectic Colorado backyard design. Or, turn to our landscape maintenance team to keep your garden looking its best all year long.

A Colorado Gardener’s February Checklist

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Source: Andrew Renn via Houzz

February is a tricky month for gardeners in the Rocky Mountain state. Sunnier days inspire hope that spring is on the way, but we know there will still be freezing temperatures before winter has truly run its course. The following Colorado gardening tips can help you give your garden the TLC it needs to begin the transition from winter to spring, without losing any beloved plants from overeager early planting.

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Source: Pendleton Design Management via Houzz

Prune trees and shrubs

One of the blessings of cold weather is that deciduous trees lose their leaves. You can finally see the true “skeleton” of the plant, which provides much easier access for pruning. Use this dormant season to remove any branches that are noticeably diseased or damaged. Trim branches that are beginning to cross their neighbors. If you have flowering or fruiting trees, thin the branches in the middle, so the tree has ample access to sunlight. Always use appropriate pruning tools.

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Source: Jocelyn H. Chilvers via Houzz

Stop pests before they start

You can use an eco-friendly dormant oil to prevent the eggs and larvae of common plant pests from maturing. Common pests in our area include leaf rollers, aphids and scale. Dormant oil is an effective means of controlling these pests without harming children or pets. Read the manufacturer’s instructions since it isn’t appropriate for all trees and shrubs.

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Source: Paintbox Garden via Houzz

Plan your garden

If you haven’t had time to plan next year’s garden amidst the holiday hubbub, now’s the time. Before you’re tempted by all the seed catalogs making their way into your mailbox, comb through your stored seeds to see what you have on hand. Then you can make a list of the flowers and vegetables you need, so you don’t overbuy.

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Source: Le jardinet via Houzz

Build a Mason Bee habitat

If you’re interested in boosting local pollination, but not so much in labor-intensive bee keeping, build a Mason Bee habitat. Mason bees are non-stinging, non-honey producing pollinators that live a solitary life.

If you don’t feel like braving your cold garden just yet, contact Lifescape Colorado. We offer year-round landscape maintenance services to ensure your gardens looks great during all four seasons.

5 Harmonious Hardscaping Ideas

A harmonious landscape is one that takes both short and long-term goals into consideration. Your landscape should be attractive, balanced and inviting, but also sustainable and environmentally friendly. When clients come to us for Colorado hardscaping services, we take the time to sit down and have a conversation regarding their long-term goals. Afterwards, we create the plans necessary for a fluid, interesting and harmonious landscape

Here are five harmonious hardscaping ideas that will keep your landscape growing in the right direction.

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Source: ModernBackyard via Houzz

Don’t be afraid to mix styles. Some of the most harmonious landscapes are those that mix both formal and informal landscaping techniques, like this row of formal planters filled with soft, informal herbs and greens.

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Source: Jay Sifford Garden Design via Houzz

Think fluidly. If not done carefully, placing a water feature and a fire pit in your landscape may make your garden feel choppy and disjointed. Create a landscape plan that incorporates features you want, while allowing space for you to move around and enjoy the view.

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Source: Kate Michels Landscape Design via Houzz

Use pavers. Begin exploring the world of pavers. They can be used to create a variety of looks, from tightly laid brickwork to large, asymmetrical stone steps. Pavers are the ultimate eco-friendly hardscape material. They’re sustainable and allow water to filter back into the groundwater supply. Pavers can even mitigate the heat island effect! Leaving space between pavers allows foliage to spring up in between spaces, which can soften the overall look.

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Source: Portal Design Inc via Houzz

Hardscape planters. By incorporating hardscape planters into your landscape, you’ll have a versatile tool at your disposal. For a modern look, you can keep the planters filled with vertical plants and shrubs that maintain a more austere appearance. In a different season, you can add cascading plants to soften the look.

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Source: Liquidscapes via Houzz

Allow overflow. In order to provide continuity, allow some of your landscape to overflow onto the hardscape. Granted, you need to plan accordingly for maintenance and safety, but this look helps to soften hardscapes by using plants choreographed for color, height and visual balance.

Contact the design team at Lifescape Colorado, and take advantage of our Colorado hardscaping services. We’ll help you plan a harmonious landscape that will provide pleasure year-round.

Essential Features for Winter Outdoor Spaces

Backyard barbeques and pool parties aren’t as popular in near freezing temperatures, but there’s no need to stay cooped up inside. Implementing essential Colorado hardscaping features will allow you to enjoy your backyard well into the winter too.

Here are Lifescape’s recommendations for must-have hardscape and landscape features for your backyard this winter, including pictures from our own project portfolio.

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Design by Lifescape Colorado

Let there be fire. Humans are always drawn to fire, whether they live in a warm tropical environment or a cooler mountain climate like ours. Adding a backyard fire pit or fireplace is one of the most important steps in making your outdoor space habitable through the colder seasons. You can also add portable space heaters around the edges, so you and your guests can stay warm on all sides.

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Source: Frederick + Frederick Architects via Houzz

Another way to make the most of an outdoor fireplace is to completely enclose your porch. You’ll be protected from humidity and mosquitoes in the summer and insulated from the elements in the winter.

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Design by Lifescape Colorado

A steamy hot tub. Hot tubs are a year-round investment. They’re soothing on a cool summer evening, but are most delightful on a crisp winter night. Hot tubs also provide a comfortable spot to star gaze at night.

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Source: Bonny Weil General Contractor via Houzz

Prepare your deck. Make sure your deck is in shape before the worst of the winter weather hits. If the wood looks worn, or your paint is chipped and fading, have it repaired, treated and sealed in the fall, so it isn’t compromised by winter’s moisture.

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Design by Lifescape Colorado

Add some color. You can use existing planter beds or container gardens to add festive appeal. Once you’ve cleared out last season’s remainders, insert evergreen boughs, redtwig dogwood branches, holly and other winter-themed plants and accents.

Contact Lifescape. We look forward to helping you plan a Colorado hardscape design that will keep you warm this winter.

How to Landscape for Privacy

While cities offer accessibility, excitement and culture, it can also mean traffic, noise and lack of privacy. This can make us long for a more rural lifestyle. Fortunately, landscaping can create a rural oasis in the midst of the action, and it will also add desirable privacy too.

The following suggestions will provide privacy from the outside world. Or, you can integrate a private nook within your Denver landscape design.

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Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Structural Privacy

One of the fastest ways to gain instant privacy is to use hardscaping. Fences, lattice work and screens can work to provide a no-view or partial-view of the outside world.

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Source: mark pinkerton – vi360 photography via Houzz

Fences. A traditional fence is always a good option for creating a backyard oasis that is kept entirely separate from the outside world. It works in larger spaces, but a smaller backyard may end up feeling boxed in if you aren’t careful.

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Source: Susan Cohan, APLD via Houzz

Panels or Lattice work. These vertical panels of lattice are more solid than traditional lattice work. By painting them, you can enhance the design appeal for backyard guests. They also provide privacy, while still allowing an outside view. You can use solid paneling for a more stylish barrier.

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Source: Carson Poetzl, Inc. via Houzz

Screens. Even freestanding screens can be used for privacy. To winter winds, you will want to reinforce them with metal or wooden posts. Climbing plants can be added for color and greenery.

Fall is the season to design and build your hardscaping, so it’s ready to go when warmer weather returns.

Living Privacy

Besides the use of climbing plants to create privacy on trellises, you can use containers and fast-growing plants for a softer barrier between you and your neighbors.

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Source: Mark English Architects, AIA via Houzz

Containers. Large-scale containers are an artful way to create a partial physical barrier. Grasses, flowering plants and trees can be added to soften the effect.

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Source: Stephanie Ann Davis Landscape Design via Houzz

Fast-growing plants. Bamboo and horsetail are both fast-growing and tenacious plants. However, when you contain their roots, they make an excellent living fence.

The best of both worlds. This Better Homes and Gardens article has beautiful examples of how hardscaping and landscaping can be combined to enhance privacy and visual interest.

The design experts at Lifescape are eager to assist you and your Denver landscape design.